Blog

October 31, 2022
Resist Recentralization! background
October 31, 2022

Resist Recentralization!

It will always be tempting for enterprise industry players to try to reshape the world of decentralized computing and distributed consensus in the image of their own priorities: central command and control, with everything legible and accountable from a single standpoint. I’ve seen these dynamics playing out in sales pitch after sales pitch, conference presentation after conference presentation. The tech isn’t terrible, and the incentives are understandable, but isn’t it all missing the point? Shouldn’t we stop and think about what we’re actually trying to build?

October 06, 2022
High Availability in Corda 5 background
October 06, 2022

High Availability in Corda 5

One of the key features of Corda 5 is high availability (HA). A highly available system is one which guarantees some level of uptime by being resilient to faults that may occur during operation. In order to achieve this, the system needs to provide redundancy. This article will explore what kind of high availability that Corda 5 provides in contrast to previous releases of Corda, and how this is implemented in the context of executing flows.

September 08, 2022
Beyond User Stories background
September 08, 2022

Beyond User Stories

Starting as a product manager, among the strange creatures encountered on your path are so-called “user stories”. These usually appear as one-liners on product requirement documents and look like this: “As a [User] I want to do [Something] in order to [Achieve some other thing].” A vast amount of literature on user stories, how to write them and why they are useful is widely available, so there is little value in digging into those details. However, I believe it’s important to go through the reasons that they are a good tool to manage product development, but also to point out where they fall short; at least, for some type of products.

July 08, 2022
Corda 5: Restating the Corda vision background
July 08, 2022

Corda 5: Restating the Corda vision

Imagine a world where two people in completely different global and political locations could agree to something and see the results unfold simultaneously, with no slow reconciliation, no business processes involving faxes like the 1980s never ended. A world where data can actually be owned, and shared, not licensed through some central party with overarching control. Imagine your industry running on a single shared, yet secure, database. That was the founding vision of Corda. Five years on, how are we getting on and what have we learned?